Warrior Transition Command
Warrior Transition Command
U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2) 10th Anniversary

In 2004, the Army took an historic step in creating the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2). Recognizing a changing face of warfare and advances in Army Medicine that enabled more Soldiers to survive battlefield injuries, the Army established this dedicated program to provide personalized support to its most severely wounded, ill and injured.

Over the past decade, AW2 has resolved nearly 45,000 Soldier, Veteran and Family issues and tasks related to employment, finance, human resources and the Department of Veterans Affairs. AW2 has also provided dedicated support to AW2 Soldiers and Veterans on the Army team at all four Warrior Games. Seven AW2 Symposiums have resulted in change to policies, regulations and legislation, including:

For more information, click on the following press release .

AW2 Today

Today, AW2 plays a strategic and tactical role in executing the Army’s Warrior Care and Transition Program (WCTP) under the Warrior Transition Command (WTC).  Building on their breadth of experience in supporting the most severely wounded, ill and injured, AW2 transition professionals help write policies and guidance affecting all recovering Soldiers, including those at the Warrior Transition Units (WTUs). AW2’s expertise has impacted almost every aspect of the recovering Soldier’s experience, from the Comprehensive Transition Plan (CTP) and career and employment readiness to adaptive reconditioning and community support resources. 

Each AW2 Soldier and Veteran is paired with an AW2 Advocate who guides the Soldier throughout the recovery and transition process and educates the Soldier on the benefits and resources available and ensures continuity of care as the Soldier transitions. Together they collaborate to set goals for the Soldier’s, Veteran’s and Family’s future to meet the personal needs and abilities of the individual AW2 Soldier or Veteran.

AW2 Advocates are integrated into the WTU’s interdisciplinary team of medical and non-medical professionals where they help facilitate the Soldiers’ achievement of his/her Comprehensive Transition Plan (CTP) goals. Today, through the combined efforts of the WTUs and AW2, the WCTP provides personalized support to more than 24,000 Soldiers and Veterans throughout the recovery and transition process.

AW2 Stories


AW2 Advocate Patti Walker

AW2 Advocate Patti Walker

“The difference that we make can be monumental,” said AW2 Advocate Patti Walker of AW2’s impact on severely wounded, ill and injured Soldiers and Veterans.


Staff Sergeant Giovanni Pascasio

SSG Giovanni Pascasio

AW2 COAD Soldier Staff Sgt. Pascasio said “My AW2 Advocate was instrumental in helping me put together my five year plan.” Read his story here.


Staff Sergeant Jorge Haddock-Santiago

SSG Jorge Haddock-Santiago

“Taking care of Soldiers, especially when they are ill or wounded, I am proud of that,” said AW2 COAD Soldier Staff Sgt. Jorge Haddock-Santiago. Read his story here.


Staff Sergeant Giovanni Pascasio

SSG Giovanni Pascasio

AW2 COAD Soldier Staff Sgt. Pascasio said “My AW2 Advocate was instrumental in helping me put together my five year plan.” Read his story here.


Sergeant First Class David Palacios

SFC David A. Palacios

Sergeant First Class David A. Palacios credits AW2 with helping him continue on active duty despite sustaining severe physical injuries in combat in Iraq. Read his story.


AW2 Career Coordinator Roberta Berry

AW2 Career Coordinator Roberta Berry

AW2 Career Coordinator Roberta Berry helped pave the way for today’s AW2 Advocates.


Retired Specialist Ira Brownridge, Jr.

Retired Spc. Ira Brownridge Jr.

AW2 Veteran Ira Brownridge Jr. volunteers his time to support other Veterans in his local community. Learn more about his story.


Retired Sergeant Ron Wiley

Retired SGT Ron Wiley

“My AW2 Advocate gives me hope,” said retired Army Sgt. Ron Wiley, who sustained multiple injuries while deployed. Read his story here.


SPC Joshua Budd

SPC Joshua Budd

“There’s something more I have left to give to the military,” said AW2 Soldier Spc. Joshua Budd, who lost his leg in combat and now serves in the Army Marksmanship Unit.


SGT Robert Green

SSG Julio A. Larrea

“You help them identify that their road to recovery doesn’t start with the doctor. It starts at him, with his will to recover and his will to come back,” said Staff Sgt. Larrea of his work with bombing victims.


SSG Jeffrey Redman

SSG Jeffery Redman

Staff Sgt. Redman credits his AW2 Advocate at Walter Reed with helping him return to duty. “Without him, I’d probably be out of the Army. He was there for me as a friend. That meant a lot to me.”


SGT Robert Green

SGT Robert Green

“AW2 saved my life,” said Sgt. Robert Green, who credits his work in rebuilding his confidence to AW2. Read his story here.


SPC Shenae Mitchell

SPC Shenae Mitchell

Spc. Shenae Mitchell completed 44 college credits during her recovery at the Ft. Belvoir WTU. Learn more about this AW2 Soldier.


Retired SFC Karl Pasco

Retired SFC Karl Pasco

AW2 Veteran Karl Pasco received two Purple Hearts for injuries on two separate deployments. He created his own internship during his recovery and is now a student at Central Texas College.


Retired SSG Paul Roberts

Retired SSG Paul Roberts

Meet retired Staff Sgt. Paul Roberts, two-time Warrior Games medalist, father of two, federal employee and proud member of AW2.


Did You Know?

WTC is committed to providing relevant information on topics important to wounded, ill and injured Soldiers, Veterans, Families and the professionals who support them. Our “Did You Know” series offers a detailed snap shot at specific elements of the Warrior Care and Transition Program (WCTP). Check back biweekly this spring for Did You Know topics specifically related to AW2. Topics will include:

Social Media

 
 
 
 

AW2 Historical Milestones

  • April 2004: Established the Disabled Soldier Support System (DS3)
  • November 2005: Name changed to U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2)
  • June 2006: First AW2 Symposium
  • November 2008: Assumed Recovery Coordination Program mission for Army
  • April 2009: Moved under the U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM)
  • September 2009: Established AW2 Community Support Network (now WTC Community Support Network with 300 organizations)
  • October 2009: WTC was established and AW2 was integrated into WTC structure
  • May 2010: First annual Warrior Games
  • January 2011: COAD/COAR Forum
  • November 2011: Supported Comprehensive Transition Plan policy and guidance, impacting all wounded, ill and injured Soldiers
  • February 2011: Wounded Warrior Federal Employment Conference
  • February 2012: Wounded Warrior Employment Conference
  • 2013: Conducted online Symposium and AW2 Advocate training
  • 2014: Regional trainings (planned) on resilience, lessons learned, VA integration and continuity of services

 

Press Kit

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AW2 Facebook Logo

AW2 Facebook Logo