Veterans Career and Education

After becoming wounded, ill and injured, many Soldiers separate from the force, and career and education play a significant role in each Veteran’s reintegration to civilian life. Some of our Veterans and disabled Veterans may choose to apply for Federal employment and may be eligible for preference in appointment over other applicants , start their own businesses with special assistance from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), or seek employment in the private sector. U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2) Veterans may be eligible for additional career and education assistance.

Veterans should work closely with their AW2 Advocate, AW2 Career Coordinator or Warrior Care and Transition (WCT) Transition Coordinator for career, employment, and education assistance. Your AW2 Advocate, AW2 Career Coordinator and WCT Transition Coordinator can help you:

  • Identify Education Options both traditional and non-traditional that are most applicable to your career goals.
  • Identify Training Opportunities to bridge the gap between military training, skills, and certifications required for civilian positions.
  • Find Federal and Private Financial Resources to help you pay for education and training, such as the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill and private scholarships.
  • Find Employment Opportunities, including connecting you with Federal and private sector organizations that have current job openings via career expos and other programs. If you are an AW2 Veteran, we provide you access to our AW2 Preferred Employers who are looking to hire wounded, ill, and injured Veterans and have agreed to expedite the hiring process for qualified AW2 Veterans.
  • Prepare for Employment, including resume writing assistance, career assessments, honing interviewing skills and finding and enrolling in career workshops.
  • Succeed in Employment, including help educating you and employer on ways to promote Veterans’ success in the workplace via reasonable accommodation and injury education.
Veteran Career and Education

Veteran Career and Education Resources

The U.S. Army, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and Department of Labor (DOL) provide many career and education resources for Veterans and disabled Veterans that are preparing for transition, looking to find a job, searching for financial assistance or interested in obtaining career advice:

Prepare for Transition

  • Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E): Requires a service-connected VA disability rating of at least 20 percent. VR&E helps Veterans with service-connected disabilities prepare for, find and keep suitable jobs.
  • America's Heroes at Work : The America's Heroes at Work program is designed to help Veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) succeed in the workplace.
  • Veterans Employment and Training Services (VETS): VETS' mission is to provide Veterans and service members with the resources and services to succeed in the 21st century workforce by maximizing their employment opportunities and protecting their employment rights.
  • Social Security Administration (SSA) Ticket to Work Program : The Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program is an employment program for people with disabilities who are interested in going to work. The goal of the Ticket to Work Program is to increase opportunities and choices for social security disability beneficiaries to obtain employment, vocational rehabilitation, and other support services from public and private providers, employers and other organizations.

Find a Job

  • Department of Labor (DOL) One-Stop Career Centers : Located throughout the United States, DOL One-Stop Career Centers provide a wide range of services for job-seekers in a central location. These centers offer training referrals, career counseling, job listings and other employment-related services. The DOL website offers a clickable map to locate the One-Stop Career Center nearest you. For employment assistance, contact your local Veteran employment representative .
  • Veterans Preference and Special Hiring Video
  • Compensated Work Therapy : Compensated Work Therapy is a VA vocational rehabilitation program that helps place work-ready Veterans in competitive jobs and consults with business and industry regarding their employment needs.
  • FedsHireVets : FedsHireVets.gov is sponsored by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and provides additional information on the rules and eligibility for Veteran’s preference when applying for Federal jobs.
  • Veteran-Owned Businesses : The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) provides resources that can assist Veterans and disabled Veterans in achieving their entrepreneurship goals, including loan procurement, utilizing government contracting set-asides and participating in networking conferences.

Find an Internship

  • National Resource Directory: The National Resource Directory is sponsored by the Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Department of Labor (DOL). NRD.gov provides a list of organizations that support Veterans in their search for professional internship programs, as well as other resources.
Veteran Career and Education

Education and Training

  • Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP ): REAP is a DoD education benefit program designed to provide educational assistance to members of the Reserve that have been called or ordered to active duty in response to a war or national emergency (contingency operation).
  • Department of VA Montgomery G.I. Bill : The Montgomery G.I. Bill provides financial benefits to Soldiers and Veterans to help with education and training costs.
  • Department of VA Post-9/11 G.I. Bill : The Post-9/11 G.I. Bill provides financial benefits to Soldiers and Veterans who have active duty service for more than 90 days since Sept. 11, 2001 to help fund higher education.
  • Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV): EBV provides post-9/11 Veterans with training on entrepreneurship and small business management The EBV is designed to open the door to business ownership by helping Veterans develop skills associated with launching and growing a small business and leverage available programs and services.

Workplace Accommodations

  • Job Accommodation Network (JAN): JAN is sponsored by the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and helps answers questions about workplace accommodations, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and workplace
  • Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP): CAP is a centrally funded reasonable accommodations program for employees with disabilities in the DOD and helps ensure people with disabilities and wounded Service members have equal access to the information environment and opportunities in the DOD and throughout the Federal government.

For additional resources on Veterans – Career and Education, visit our VA Resources page or contact us.

Frequently Asked Questions

How can I improve my chances of becoming employed?
Do I need different resumes for private industry employment and Federal employment?
Where can I get help writing my resume?
Where can I find additional information on Federal employment for Veterans?
I’ve applied for several Federal jobs.  I have been rated “qualified but not referred.” What does this mean?
I am applying for Federal positions but I keep receiving notices that I am not qualified for the job.  What should I do?
I need accommodations to help me perform my duties.  What do I do?
I think my office is discriminating against me because of my disability.  What should I do?

How can I improve my chances of becoming employed?

There are many ways to improve your chance of success in your job search, such as:

  • Reading vacancy announcements very closely and ensuring you include all required documents and answer all questions. 
  • Having a resume  that clearly explains how your education and experience relates to the position.
  • Being flexible on job location.  The more flexibility you have in regards to location, the better chance you have of receiving offers of employment.
  • Researching the company/agency before attending an interview. This will prepare you in answering questions on how you may be a good fit, as well as demonstrate your knowledge and interest in the company/agency
  • Cleaning up your “online” self.  Search your name on the internet and ensure you do not have any information or photographs that may portray you in an unprofessional or negative light.
  • Using a professional email address and having a professional voicemail greeting message.
  • Returning all calls and emails promptly from employers.
  • Showing up on time for interviews and other appointments.

Do I need different resumes for private industry employment and Federal employment?

Yes. In the private industry, a hiring manager will often spend only 30 to 60 seconds reviewing your resume, so it should not exceed two pages. It is during this time they will decide if they want to bring you in for an interview. During the interview they will ask questions to determine if you are qualified for the position.

For Federal employment, the personnel office will review your resume to determine if you meet the minimum qualifications for the position. Therefore, you must place all of your experiences, education, etc. that are applicable to the minimum qualifications in your resume. Your Federal resume can be several pages long. Once it is determined you meet the minimum qualifications, your resume will be ranked along with all other applicants. Most often, only those receiving the highest scores will be referred to the hiring manager.

Where can I get help writing my resume?

You can contact the following resources to get help with your resume:

Where can I find additional information on Federal employment for Veterans?

The best resource is the Office of Personnel and Management (OPM). There is an entire section on their website devoted to Federal employment of Veterans. If you are an AW2 Veteran, you may also contact your AW2 Advocate or Career Coordinator for additional information.

I’ve applied for several Federal jobs.  I have been rated “qualified but not referred.”  What does this mean?

It depends. You could have met all of the minimum qualifications, but other applicants were rated higher based on their experience and/or education. It could also mean the position was filled with a Priority Placement Program (PPP) candidate or with an individual with a different hiring authority or priority. Visit www.opm.gov for more information.

I am applying for Federal positions, but I keep receiving notices that I am not qualified for the job.  What should I do?

There are several approaches you should take:

  • Each vacancy announcement has a point of contact (POC) listed. Send an email to the POC asking why you were not rated as “qualified”. They will provide general information such as, “didn’t meet requirements for one year specialized experience,” “didn’t provide requested documentation,” etc.
  • Reread the requirements listed in the vacancy announcement. Ensure you have addressed all the requirements in your application.
  • If your application and resume meets all of their requirements, ask the POC for a relook. Direct them to the section of your resume that demonstrates the required experience/education.

I need accommodations to help me perform my duties.  What do I do?

Visit our Reasonable Accommodations page for additional information. You may also contact your supervisor, company or agency Human Resource Office, EEO Disability Office, or AW2 Advocate or Career Coordinator.  Any of these offices will be able to help you.

I think my office is discriminating against me because of my disability.  What should I do?

You may contact your company or agency Human Resource Office, EEO Disability Office, or AW2 Advocate or Career Coordinator.  Any of these offices will be able to help you.

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